How To Increase Clicks On Your Tweets [Infographic]

More clicks for your tweets If you are an entrepreneur using Twitter as part of the marketing strategy for your business or you are a blogger trying to improve your traffic, one of the most important metrics you look at is how many clicks your tweets are getting, specially when those tweets are containing links to your own site.

One thing I’ll tell you right off the bat is that, marketing in general works different for each one of us and it delivers different kinds of results too. Twitter is no different and, while I always say that you should not rely on anybody’s advice but instead run several tests until you find the most effective way, the data in this infographic offers a very nice starting point for you to do so.

The infographic is from Dan Zarrella, I’m pretty sure you’re familiar with his work but if you’re not, click on that link and bookmark his blog or subscribe to his RSS. What I like about Dan is that he gets simple things we all need to know and he goes very deep into the data to provide you with tips you can take action on.

The formula here compares the number of clicks against the number of followers in a Twitter account at the moment of that tweet to calculate CTR (Click-through Rate).

Number of Clicks / Number of Followers = CTR

With this formula, Dan is able to look at which tweets perform better depending on:

  • The length of the tweet
  • Where you position the link
  • The frequency of your tweets
  • Some of the most common terms used
  • and when we tweet

Do your own testing…

So the way you’re going to keep track of your results, in a simple way, is to write the number of followers you have when you post the tweet and then at the end of the day, look at how many clicks it received. More importantly, include the actual tweet and the day/time in your report to track exactly what you did. No need to make things complicated, you can actually do this on a simple spreadsheet.

I will try to do the same exercise and come back to you guys later to share my own results with you.

I’d love to see what you guys have to say about your own experience, if you have tested some of these tactics or what is giving you good results to get more clicks on your tweets. Enjoy!

How to increase click on your Tweets

Infographic from Dan Zarrella.

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  • http://girlseeksplace.wordpress.com/ Brianna

    This was super helpful. I’m not normally a fan of the infographic, but this one was clear and easy to understand. The tips are helpful and I’m going to work on making them a regular part of my time on Twitter.

  • http://www.socialmouths.com/ Francisco Rosales

    Glad you found it useful, come back and share with me how your testing went.

    Thank you

  • http://www.prepaidplans.com.au PrepaidPlans

    First time I have read such in depth analysis about tweeting and CRT. I will test this out. Clicks on tweets is something I want more of. I don’t anywhere near enough.

  • http://twitter.com/mikelimjoco Michael Limjoco

    Terrific.  So much information presented in such a concise manner!

  • http://socialmediamanagerinc.com David Mon

    I like every one else really like this infographic.  I have an issue with the paper.li section though. I contend that the clicks are just people trying to see what of theirs was posted and weather or not they find it it, there is little or no translation to CTR to their web site.  Furthermore if the person has never conversed with the person they @replied in the tweet it could potentially be seen as a spam tweet. Maybe I am way off here but its my two sense, I’d love to hear someone on the other side of the fence.

  • http://megmccormick.com/ Social Media Meg

    I love infographics! Best way to present data! Fun and informative and thanks for crunching the data for the rest of us!

  • http://twitter.com/SamuelUherek Samuel Uherek

    This post is really cool. I was wondering how it all works. I was going to even test the CTR, but wasn’t really sure how to start. It seems that this answered a lot of my questions. Now I only have to apply it to my followers and see what happens.

  • http://krittersthattwitter.com/ Lisa

    this is great information, I had never saw actual stats that had been generated from research on tweets. thanks!

  • http://learnit2earnitwithlynn.com Lynn Brown

    Stats are always interesting to see and review.  But I agree know that it does depend on your business, market, audience as it is never a clear cut rule for any social media site.  Test, re-test is what will provide information for your specific business and marketing plan.  But I do find your ‘word’ stats really interesting and will be sure to test that out!

  • http://www.socialmouths.com/ Francisco Rosales

    I’m 100% with you Lynn. Sometimes we get used to posting at the same times, doing things in a certain way and we stop testing but getting out of the norm can get us different results. We have to keep testing all the time as things around us change too.

    Thanks for your comment.

  • http://www.socialmouths.com/ Francisco Rosales

    As I mentioned in the post, @danzarrella:twitter does have other very interesting posts on research he does himself. You should definitely check him out if you haven’t.

    Thanks for stopping by =)

  • http://www.socialmouths.com/ Francisco Rosales

    Hey Samuel, thanks for your comment. It definitely works as a good starting point to test different things. Keep mixing things up and tracking your results to find your best performance.

  • http://www.socialmouths.com/ Francisco Rosales

    Hey David, the point on that section of the infographic is to show how different terms can also affect the CTR, however, I don’t think the intention is to recommend Paper.li.

    I do agree with you, we should focus on CTR to our own online properties, what’s the point of sending traffic to a 3rd party, right?

    I appreciate your comment, good to have you here.

  • http://www.socialmouths.com/ Francisco Rosales

    I agree, I love the simplicity of Dan’s work.

  • http://www.janereynolds.co.uk/ Jane Reynolds

    How can you see ‘How many clicks’ a tweet/link has received? I feel like I’m swimming through mud trying to find accurate stats (whereas most people seem to know exactly where/how to find them)!

  • http://www.eBizROI.com Rick Noel, eBiz ROI, Inc.

    This is interesting data. Thanks for sharing. Dan Zarella and Hubspot are Internet marketing experts and share some unique and actionable information regarding twitter and other social platforms. Another tweet KPI beyond CTR is followers gained as a result of a tweet based on discovery of your tweet by interested twitter users who are relevant to your business. Excellent infographic! I would be interested to hear what tools others user to track twitter follower acquisition. Thanks!

  • https://twitter.com/#!/CGarafola Chris Garafola

    Hi Francisco, thanks for the post. I had left a comment on this infographic when Dan posted it. However, he never responded to me, so I was wondering if you could add some clarification.
    Dan posted an inforgraphic (here it is http://bit.ly/qBRgIH) that says Adverbs actually give you the least amount of shares on Twitter. Whereas, with this new infographic, he’s saying it gets the highest CTR. If this holds true, wouldn’t these wash each other out? If not, which is more effective…to get shares or higher CTR. Are they mutually exclusive? 

    Thanks!

    Chris 

  • http://www.socialmouths.com/ Francisco Rosales

    Hey Chris, I just looked at it, great find by the way. What I see is that we’re talking about 2 different things here, shares and CTR and while we should definitely care about shares (marketing), click-throughts are more important (results).

    I guess it would be great to get Dan’s thoughts on why adverbs will result in fewer shares but more CTR, or if this is a mistake, but to me is more important that we do our own testing.

    Thanks for comment

  • http://www.socialmouths.com/ Francisco Rosales

    Jane, this is a great question. The easiest way to see how many times a tweets has been clicked is by looking at simple analytics provided by Twitter clients or short URL services. I can recommend Hootsuite and Bit.ly, if you want to keep it simple, just create an account on http://bit.ly and use its URL’s, they automatically gather that data for you.

    I’m attaching an image for you.

  • http://twitter.com/ertenhoor Emiel R. ten Hoor

    Wondering what would be the most clicked adverbs. Beautifully? quickly? slowly? Would be an interesting addition :)

  • http://www.hotspotpromotion.com/ HotSpot Promotion

    I love this.  Simple, straightforward, easy to grasp.  I think it’s possible that there might be other things that were not taken into account to create these results, and, as with anything, one has to be careful to not take it all as gospel truth, but it’s a terrific starting place to do your own experimenting.  Thanks for the post!

  • https://twitter.com/#!/CGarafola Chris Garafola

    I definitely agree that CTR are more important than a share as it’s a result. However, lots of shares increase the likely hood of virality, which in turn, can increase the likelihood of CTR. I’m assuming the curve isn’t linear. For instance, at what point are more shares better than CTR. Example, 10 CTR may be more effective than 10 shares. But does the same go for 50 CTR and 50 shares (assuming when a link is shared 50 unique times, the reach will probably be in the thousands when their fans/followers see it).

    Thanks so much for the response though Francisco. I’ve bookmarked your website and will be checking it daily — very thought provoking material. 

    -Chris 

  • Mullenann4

    I had just about given up on Twitter because none of my tweets were getting clicked, at least that’s what Buffer told me. They didn’t even post over weekends. Now I am wondering why not.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/5KKNRWPUABKBCRAJGWSHZYMVAI Ann

    Cool post, thanks for sharing, now i know how to post my tweet for more clicks.

  • Bob Berry

    Francisco – great tips and insights. I’m starting to figure out not only how to best use Twitter, but how to time it, integrate it, and reference it with my other online activities. My question is: do you know of any stats that show how followers choose who to follow? How many come from searching Twitter, seeing retweets, click Twitter links on blogs and web sites, etc. Have you seen any data like that?

  • http://makemoneywithandroid.blogspot.com/ Bill

    Thanks for the awesome find!

  • http://www.trickmaker.com/ Trickmaker

    Thanks for this trick.

  • Yanglaimi

    Hi Francisco Rosales
     I wonder how the effect of CTR are calculated?

  • http://www.nichesense.com/ Anshul

    Oh Wow this is a great Analysis. Francisco, it would be interesting to know if shortened links get more clicks than the actual full length links. Besides saving on the 140 character limit I wonder if shortened links also arouse curiosity and people are more likely to click to see where it take them? 

  • Ozio Media

    This is good stuff, particularly for people who are just getting started with Twitter and looking for ways to make it as beneficial and useful as possible. It makes sense that there are measurable metrics for Twitter just like there are for everything else, but it may not be as obvious for users as it would be for other social media avenues. Of particular interest, and a great point, was the advice to experiment and see what works for you.

  • Anonymous

    I find Tweeting on the weekends to be more beneficial than weekdays.

    I also think more people spend time on Twitter on weekends and therefore are more engaged to the content so you can start a conversation too.

  • http://www.laborthink.com/ laborthink

    Great infographic. Very helpful.

  • alukeonlife

    I agree with David, when I’ve researched paper.li most people see it as spam, only clicking it if they’re listed to see what story of theirs is in there.

  • http://www.webtrafficzebra.com/ Marica Zammit

    This is pure gold Francisco! Thanks for sharing this. Don’t think I ever came across such detailed stats on tweets and presented in such a simple, easy to understand manner. Off to sharing this one :) Thank you!

  • http://www.sandiegobusinesslawfirm.com/business-entity/starting-a-business-in-california Niki Fennell

    If you are an entrepreneur using Twitter as part of the marketing
    strategy for your business or you are a blogger trying to improve your
    traffic, one of the most important metrics you look at is how many clicks your tweets are getting, specially when those tweets are containing links to your own site.

  • http://www.rhinoplastynet.com/ Reneakell

    Dan is that he gets simple things we all need to know and he goes very
    deep into the data to provide you with tips you can take action on

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    marketing to generate traffic and convert to leads and sales. Caffeine addict and a hopeless fan of Dr. 

  • http://unwiredpromotions.com/ Stormy

    The formula here compares the number of
    clicks against the number of followers in a Twitter account at the
    moment of that tweet to calculate CTR (Click-through Rate).
     

  • http://www.alcantaramedia.com/ Boca Raton Internet Marketing

    Wow, these stats are huge. I love how marketers share knowledge! Thanks Dan for doing the research and thanks Frank for distributing it!

  • http://www.inkasatm.com/ Shelba

    The formula here compares the number of
    clicks against the number of followers in a Twitter account at the
    moment of that tweet to calculate CTR (Click-through Rate).
     

  • http://yourgilbertazdentist.com/ Casie

    Wow,
    these stats are huge. I love how marketers share knowledge! Thanks Dan
    for doing the research and thanks Frank for distributing it!

     

  • http://www.acantohotels.com/ luxury hotel playa del carmen

    Dan is that he gets simple things we all need to know and he goes very
    deep into the data to provide you with tips you can take action on.

  • Elicia Mesa

    Twitter is no different and, while I always say that you should not rely
    on anybody’s advice but instead run several tests until you find the
    most effective way, the data in this infographic offers a very nice
    starting point for you to do so.

    http://www.capitol-partners.com/