3 Proven Facts To Get More Retweets

How to get more retweetsThis is a guest post by Leo Widrich from BufferApp.

Wow, this must be a surprise. Only a few weeks ago, Francisco gave me the chance to write a guestpost here at SocialMouths. And everything I wrote in there was about making Twitter work for you by focusing on the people, not on metrics.

Now this?

The idea, which I have expressed earlier definitely hasn’t changed. Recently we did some research, focusing on what impact scheduling Tweets with Buffer can have for you. Here are the results in numbers:

“People that start to Buffer their Tweets increased clicks on links they posted by 200% within 2 weeks of using. The amount of retweets doubles on average. Finally Buffer users increase their follower count by 104 followers within 3 weeks on average.”

Obviously, the far more interesting question here is: Why are these figures happening?

I had a go at the results and looked at the causes of these increased clicks, retweets and followers. The results are very much in line with the suggestions of last time’s post:

1 – Tweet at Times Your Followers Are Online

Very often, we are reading at times, when it isn’t a great time to actually share on Twitter. In my case, I am usually reading posts late at night or early in the morning. According to the study Buffer’s suggested optimal times account for the largest part of increased click rates on Tweets sent.

The algorithm for these times is based on general Twitter peak times, where most Tweeting activity is happening. Of course you can always go ahead and change these times if you wish to Tweet more frequently or at different times you consider best.

2 – Tweet Frequently, But Not Too Frequently

Another component was that Buffer made it a lot easier for users to Tweet more regularly and at a higher frequency. The features used the most for Buffering are the browser extensions for Chrome, Safari and Firefox. With it you can add any article you are reading to your Buffer with just one click, here is how this looks like:

Buffer

Another feature was that it allowed users to Retweet more people by adding retweets to their Buffer. This happens via a Buffer button right inside Twitter.com that turns every Tweet into an old school RT.

Add a Tweet

An interesting point here, that actually feeds in from Dan Zarrella’s research, which is quite similar: Going over 4 Tweets posted per hour will drop your click through rate to literally zero. This is quite understandable as this many updates are just overwhelming for your followers.

3 – Promote Others More

Another very interesting find was that people who Tweeted a great variety of sources, averaged a higher click through rate than people who focused on one or only a very limited number of blogs.

Although you have already guessed that this is true, I find it very interesting that it can make such a big difference for your followers. The idea here is that you try to link to the best content you can find and do so by looking at a great variety of blogs that you Tweet. It is a great way to build trust and makes your stream way less self-promotional.

So yes, even though I tried to focus very much metrics for this post, it is interesting to show that the main driver of increased clicks and retweets, still remains to be engagement.

What are your thoughts on Buffer? Do you think it could help bringing up the direct return to your Twitter efforts too?

You can give it a go here: Buffer.

Leo Wid on SocialMouthsLeo Widrich is the cofounder of BufferApp.com, a Twitter App that allows users to schedule tweets easier than other scheduling Apps you might know of. As he focuses on getting Buffer off the ground, Leo writes and gives Twitter Tips at blog.bufferapp.com. Leon loves to connect and build a relationship with new users. Don’t hesitate to say Hi.

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  • http://www.realityburst.com Eugene Farber

    Hey Leo, 

    I actually just wrote a post about timing tweets on Thursday over at my blog. I haven’t had a chance to check out Buffer yet, does it allow you to measure when your tweets are getting the most click-throughs. The solution I came up with is kind of simplistic, but it provides for unique URLs at different times of day to see which work best. 

  • http://www.socialmouths.com Francisco Rosales

    Hey Eugene, can you share the link to your post so we can check it out?

    Thanks!

  • http://www.facebook.com/MorganBarnhart Morgan Barnhart

    It’s interesting because while the stats used to say more people were on during the day, people are actually more interactive in the evenings and on weekends. Interesting how things change! Important to keep up-to-date with those changes, too, so you can get the most out of your tweets. Good tips!

  • http://www.realityburst.com Eugene Farber
  • http://twitter.com/LeoWid Leo Widrich

    Hi Morgan, 

    Thanks a lot for your comment.

    Yes, you are right, for getting clicks and retweets a different time will be optimal in comparison to having the best interaction. We found that normal work hours between a time window of 8am – 8pm give Tweets the most exposure! :) 

  • http://twitter.com/LeoWid Leo Widrich

    Hi Eugene, 

    Thanks a lot for stopping by. Yes, so Buffer by default picks Twitter peak times and increases clicks and retweets that way. I believe teaming it up with your findings will also work well.

    I just hopped over to your post and it is a great analysis there and similar to the findings we have found. Buffer nearly always picks a default time around 4.00pm because this is a great timing. Buffered your post over there for sure! :) Thanks for sharing!

  • http://www.realityburst.com Eugene Farber

    Thanks Leo! I’ll have to check it out. I’ve heard good things about Buffer from multiple sources, just never got around to playing around with it. I’ll have to make it a priority.

  • http://twitter.com/SpearsMarketing Seth Spears

    Just started using Buffer last week.  Love the functionality of it.  Wish it had the ability to use su.pr to shorten links.  

  • http://twitter.com/SpearsMarketing Seth Spears

    Just started using Buffer last week.  Love the functionality of it.  Wish it had the ability to use su.pr to shorten links.  

  • http://twitter.com/LeoWid Leo Widrich

    Hi Seth, thanks a lot for stopping by here, so glad you like it. Awesome, that’s a great point and would make it a lot more versatile! 

  • http://twitter.com/LeoWid Leo Widrich

    Hi Seth, thanks a lot for stopping by here, so glad you like it. Awesome, that’s a great point and would make it a lot more versatile! 

  • http://amymittelman.com/musings Amy

    Isn’t the point of twitter to be an immediate response? Doesn’t scheduling tweets take away from the original point?

  • http://newscubamarketing.com Nick @ SCUBAMarketing

    How does Buffer default to Twitter peak times? When I go into my account to add a time, there’s no suggested times that I’m seeing. Do I need to delete all of my existing times and start over?

  • http://www.ianmayman.com/ Ian

    Amy, I think scheduling is essential to maintaining a stream of recent updates, but responding to people should be done at a convenient time to you (for which you should get emailed) and then at the same time respond to people who say something relevant to other who may not have noticed you.

    For a small business, responding immediately is not worth the time unless there are enough responses coming in to justify employing someone to do it full-time, so it far better to set aside perhaps ten minutes, a few times a day to respond, or whenever a break from routine is needed. It’s unreasonable to expect an immediate response to email, many in tech support take at least 24 hours, so why expect a quick response to tweets and updates?

  • http://www.ianmayman.com/ Ian

    Eugene, Buffer does measure the reach of each tweet (number of followers you have at the time of the tweet, plus the followers of those who retweeted it), and it tells you how many retweets and clicks a link in the tweet received. It’s very well designed and user-friendly in my opinion.

  • http://www.ianmayman.com/ Ian

    I’ve read a few things on this. One Twitter app said 11am and 4pm are the best times based on my followers, but more recently I’ve heard around 9am, 1pm, and 5pm because that hits the break times of a lot of people in the UK, and the U.S east and west coasts. I focus on those more recent times and tweet slightly more frequently on Fridays and Saturdays.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ezipezionlineinternetmarketing Klara

    Thanks for the tips! I’ll give Buffer a try later! 

  • http://www.commun.it SharelOmer

    Go Leo :) great article :) keep on sprained Twitter best practices, and proved a great tool that help people implement the best practices :)

  • http://twitter.com/FelicityGilbert Felicity Gilbert

    Being a time poor person I was a selfish tweeter, I used Twitter mostly to source great content rather than share it. I discovered buffer a week ago and already I am sharing more often, it makes it so much easier and more efficient to schedule my tweets and be done as opposed to my previous sporadic bursts of activity. Thanks for this post, it has given me some great ideas as to how I can better utilise the service. What I would really like is the to have tweets scheduled for optimum times around the world in addition to the ones optimised for my timezone. This way I would have a more effective global reach.

  • http://twitter.com/Initi8Marketing Tom Crawshaw

    Another great post! Seems common sense to some, but others don’t realize the power of scheduling your tweets.  I find sites like https://crowdbooster.com and http://www.whentotweet.com/ useful in finding when most of your followers are online.  

  • http://twitter.com/LeoWid Leo Widrich

    Hi @scubamarketing:disqus , great to see you here. Sure so at the moment, resetting to default times isn’t quite possible, but we definitely want to make this work in the future! :) 

  • http://www.ricardobueno.com Ricardo Bueno

    Love that you added the last tip about promoting others more than you promote yourself. I think this part is totally important and one most people miss. The more you promote others, the more likely that they are to promote you in return. Period. 

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  • Anonymous

    This was short and sweet!

  • http://chamberlaingroup.ca/ Jared : chamberlaingroup.ca

    Thanks for the Tips.  Sounds simple to most, but actually doing it regularly is the challenge.

  • http://twitter.com/xcnic87 Nicole Schmidt

    This is a great list of tips! Retweets are a great way to gain more followers.  it is very important to link content and make your engagement likeable.  The best way to expand your brand is to get your name out there.  I think this post will really help reach out to people who are confused about how they will begin.  This is right to the point and Im sure will be a great guide for any beginner.

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    The algorithm for these times is based on general Twitter peak times

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    Obviously, the far more interesting question here is: Why are these figures happening?

  • http://sneakernews.com/ Ayesha

    Finally Buffer users increase their follower count by 104 followers within 3 weeks on average.”

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    The results are very much in line with the suggestions of last time’s post:

  • http://www.360fm.com.au/ 360fm

    If you wish to Tweet more frequently or at different times you consider best.