5 Things to Consider When Monitoring Your Brand on Twitter

Monitoring your brand on Twitter

A couple of weeks ago we talked about ways to change what people say about your brand online, to continue in that line, this week we’ll discuss a few things you need to consider when monitoring your brand on Twitter, again in collaboration with Mention.

The main point of the post is that, even if you are actively monitoring Twitter for brand mentions, there may be some situations when these mentions are invisible to you, and what to do so you no longer miss them and address them properly.

Just so you know, the post includes an infographic and a video courtesy of Mention at the bottom.

1) Monitoring your brand mentions

This is a given, you know you need to have both a strategy and the necessary resources to not only monitor these mentions, but also to respond. But you should take this a step further, the study says that brands get an average of 39 mentions per day…

Do you know what that number is for you?

Use a tool that can give you that metric, or create your own way of measuring how many mentions you get per day or week. If possible, track what type of mentions they are: Positive or negative, a link, a request for tech support, general customer service, questions, etc.

Have a response strategy that includes items like:

  • Response times
  • How to respond
  • Who should respond (is it an issue that needs to be escalated?)

Knowing how many mentions your brand gets will help you decide if you or your community manager can handle the flow, or if you need to grow your team or resources.

2) Mentions that omit the @

The following is only a link to a blog post, but it’s a perfect example of omitting the @ in the brand name.

You are aware of this, what you probably don’t know is that 30.72% of all mentions actually fail to refer to a brand by its Twitter handle. This is an easy way to completely miss the mention. My friend Aaron Lee recommends to make sure that your monitoring strategy not only include the handle, but also important keywords and any variations of the brand name.

3) Conversations around the brand

Not all tweets mentioning the name of the brand are directed to the actual brand. According to Mention, only 9.16% of these tweets start with the @. As Brian Honigman points out, these are conversations happening around the brand, not necessarily talking to the brand. You should monitor not only direct replies, but any tweet that mentions the brand in any way, and not ignore these opportunities to engage. Here are a couple of examples, the first tweet is obviously directed to the brand.

But the second tweet is a conversation around the brand.

Even though the tweet is not directed to the brand, it should be addressed.

4) Negative mentions don’t always spread

No business like having negative mentions, but this doesn’t usually happen, at least not to the point of hurting a brand. 60.20% of tweets mentioning brands don’t get retweeted.

This doesn’t mean you have to ignore them. Jason Keath of Social Fresh recommends focusing on meaningful, honest, one-on-one conversation. When you do this, a negative comment or mention can be turned into something positive.

Here is an example of how Buffer turned a bad situation into a lesson on how to handle a crisis, creating a positive outcome and getting stronger than ever before by simply being upfront, open and human in their communication.

Buffer turning a bad situation into a positive outcome on Twitter

Jason also recommends sharing positive mentions with your followers.

5) Mentions outside of working hours

The Internet never sleeps, 60% of brand mentions happen outside of working schedules.

This doesn’t mean you will miss the mention, but you will probably be late to respond. Depending on the amount of mentions your brand receives, and their nature (they could be tech support or customer service requests), you should look into having the proper resources in place, as Rudolphe Dute from Buffer suggests, hire evening and weekend reps.

I know many readers of SocialMouths are small business owners that have small teams or are wearing many hats when it comes to social media, if this is your case, set up the proper tools to be alerted of these mentions when you are outside of business hours.

Infographic by Mention

5 things to consider when monitoring your brand on Twitter

Or you can watch the video version here:

  • Man, I LOVE that beat that plays on the video!

    And I also loved doing just a plain search on Twitter and seeing exactly what was brought up here – all the feedback where people were talking about us; not to us.

    It would be totally awesome to see everything said as quickly as possible. Maybe I missed it in the article above, but I wanted to ask what is the tool you most recommend to the lean enterprise in order to stay on top of the social media conversations going on about our business?

  • mitcoivanov

    Great reminders, thank you Francisco! I’ll share the post with some of my circles.

  • Hi Francisco, thanks so much for including this infographic I was in and calling out my Twitter handle. Much appreciated!

  • Twitter is one of the most effective ways in showing your brand, it is a
    great tool to be known online. Careful tweeting of a content is a must

  • Great tip. as per my view, tweet content strategy is a must!

  • Mariana

    Excellent info! I personally think that Twitter is one of the keys SM tools that a company NEEDS to know how to use to see it grow. I thank you for helping them with this great advice list!

    I work in a Social Media company that does the same thing 🙂 so I can relate. Actually, there’s a post on there that can be helpful for this topic, this is the link: http://nimblemedia.ca/6-proven-ways-boost-twitter-reach/

    I hope your readers find it useful 😀

  • Your very fantastic tipis for thanks .
    I have many many email database serves provider company in website .
    Well done boss

  • Sofie Nelen

    All info is useful and to the point, it even inspired a blogpost of our own! 🙂

    We used it in our research/thoughts on how social media and surveys can work together. Of course we made sure you were mentioned there. If you want, you can take look at it here http://bit.ly/1OeAOR0