What is a Sandbox and Why Every Business on Facebook Should Use One

Why every business should have a facebook sandbox

This is a guest post by Jim Belosic from ShortStack.

Ever hear the term “Sandbox” thrown around Facebook? It’s not a reference to the box of sand you put in your backyard for endless hours of fun for the kids. A Sandbox is a Facebook Page that businesses use to install and test custom Facebook apps. Sandbox Pages are separate from main business Pages and kept secret from fans.

A Sandbox Page has several benefits for businesses and for agencies creating custom Facebook apps for clients. Usually, several sets of eyes need to see and approve an app before it’s published to Facebook, and Sandbox Pages provide a way to do just that. Here are six reasons why your business or agency should implement a Sandbox page as part of your editing process.

Errors make you and your business look bad

The last thing a business wants is to get caught with an obvious spelling or grammar error that could have been avoided by having a few more eyes on the app before hitting “publish.”

Not every user will view your app the same way

Not everyone accessing Facebook is sitting behind an iMac and using Safari. There’s a number of web browsers and computers out there. Assuring your app works on as many browsers and computers as possible is essential to avoid the “I can’t access your app” complaint.

One broken link can ruin an app

If a business is running a complicated custom app there could be numerous links, entry forms, share buttons, and more. Asking your team to do a thorough check through all buttons and features on your custom app can save time and money.

Practice makes perfect

A Sandbox page is a place for businesses to practice posting, pinning, and making an app a favorite before making it viewable to the public. All links can be tested, and you can even see how your app will appear on your Timeline when it’s shared.

Eliminates the need for a “white-label” service

Often times, agencies create custom Facebook Page apps for clients using a third-party platform. Most third-party platforms offer a white-label service on the front end of their product, but not on the backend. This puts agencies in a bind when they’re trying to run a custom app by a client, but don’t want to reveal the tools they’ve used to build it. Using a Sandbox Page eliminates this problem by providing a place for clients to view and approve their app.

Use in-house for voting contests:

Businesses running voting contests often want their employees’ input on the entries.

Normally this would require the person reviewing the entries to have access to the backend of the custom app platform. But if a business is using a third-party application this means providing admin rights, which could get tricky if the business has several employees reviewing entries. A Sandbox Page provides a place where entries can be featured and everyone in-house can provide feedback.

The next time you need someone to review and edit your custom app, consider creating a Sandbox Page. It’s the same thing as creating any business page on Facebook. If you’re concerned about people finding your Sandbox page and seeing things you’re testing, just give it an obscure name that isn’t related to your business. A Sandbox Page is a quick, easy, and free solution to having a place to test an app and make sure it’s perfect before it makes its debut in the real world, or at least in the Facebook world.

Photo credit: solofotones

  • Great to know Jim and Francisco, man keeping up with all this is a wonder 😉

  • Here are six reasons why your business or agency should implement a Sandbox page as part of your editing process.

  • Surminga

    I must say I’ve never took any notice of this and never looked into ‘sandbox’. 
    Will from now on I will though

  • Here are six reasons why your business or agency should implement a Sandbox page as part of your editing process.

  • Oh, but it is a sandbox! It really is: “a reference to the box of sand you put in your backyard for endless hours of fun for the kids.”

    I was interested because this seemed to be a post of substantial value to anyone deploying customer apps on facebook. This is not something that I have done; so I was curious to learn about it.

    But, phew! I nearly stopped reading when I read: “It’s not a reference to the box of sand you put in your backyard for endless hours of fun for the kids.”. This undermined my expectations of the value and credibility of the whole post which is titled: “What is a Sandbox …”, but which seemed not to know!

    However, I was interested enough to read a little more; and, thankfully, the next two sentences (the last two of the first paragraph) established that this was about what I thought it was about. This restored some of that lost credibility and I continued. But, that was close thing, you nearly lost me right at the start!

    Surely, the whole point of the name of this facility is that you can play safely in the sandbox? And the post goes on to explain that!

  • sivasankar1323

    Great  Article   liked the start”Ever hear the term “Sandbox” thrown around Facebook? It’s not a reference to the box of sand you put in your backyard for endless hours of fun for the kids” this made me to keep on reading.We are testing some of our apps in Sandbox.It is very simple and we have provided quality apps by use of sandbox.

  • iancleary

    It brings me back to the days of software development where we had staging and live server.  It goes to staging server first and then if all is ok we hit the button and launch live.  We still had problems on the live server but the staging server (aka sandbox) helps reduce on embarrassing problems!!

  • the staging server (aka sandbox) helps reduce on embarrassing problems!!

  • Facebook, and Sandbox Pages provide a way to do just that. Here are six
    reasons why your business or agency should implement a Sandbox page as
    part of your editing process.

  • Burberry Robinson

    use to install and test custom Facebook apps. Sandbox Pages are separate from main business Pages and kept secret from fans.

    http://www.drphilhaeck.com/
     

  • Facebook apps for clients. Usually, several sets of eyes need to see and
    approve an app before it’s published to Facebook, and Sandbox Pages
    provide a way to do just that. Here are six reasons why your business or
    agency should implement a Sandbox page as part of your editing process.

  • use to install and test custom Facebook apps. Sandbox Pages are separate from main business Pages and kept secret from fans.

  • Natalie Logan

    Page that businesses use to install and test custom Facebook apps.
    Sandbox Pages are separate from main business Pages and kept secret from
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  • Chika Green

    Usually, several sets of eyes need to see and approve an app before it’s
    published to Facebook, and Sandbox Pages provide a way to do just that.
    Here are six reasons why your business or agency should implement a
    Sandbox page as part of your editing process.

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  • Angeles Johansen

    Assuring your app works on as many browsers and computers as possible is
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